Category Archives: ZG Maps

Why Managing Vulnerability and Reputation is More Important than Ever Before

In ZG Mapping, one of the patterns that emerges suggests that as technology becomes closer and closer to us, we are less able to manage privacy at each advancing layer.  Today, through social networks, sensors, geo-location software, personal DNA testing, quantified self technologies and more, highly personal, private and intimate information about us and our relationships is more readily available than ever before.

Can we really expect to manage privacy?  Not so much.  It makes more sense to turn our efforts toward managing vulnerability and reputation.  What might that look like?  I welcome your comments.

ZG Maps track the deterioration of privacy and the increased exposure to our most intimate selves using examples for each era.  The years noted follow the ZG Maps twenty year eras.

The Public Layer:  Mainframe Computers (1945-1965)

Mainframes were operated by experts for the benefit of a select few in higher level management.  Most employees were data workers with limited access to information, dreaming of a day when information would be more available.    Example: The public was vaguely aware that Eisenhower had an affair.  Details and press were limited.

The Personal Layer:  the Personal Computer (1965-1985)

Personal computers brought information much closer to us.   The power of information, words and images, for storage and  manipulation was now on the desktop.  Example: President and Nancy Reagan used Joan Quigley as their personal astrologer.  The press reported on certain instances where Ms. Quigley’s calculations determined the timing of delicate meetings and diplomatic travel.

The Private Layer:  Mobile Devices (1985-2005)

With mobile devices, technology moved into our private space.  At the same time, increasingly private information about public figures and about ourselves became more available to others.  Example:  The press covered every detail of Monica Lewinsky and Bill Clinton, including their creative uses for cigars.

The Intimate Layer: Quantified Self Technologies – personal DNA testing, etc. (2005-2025)

Technologies like Navigenics and 23andme.com make personal DNA testing available to anyone interested and willing to pay.  Technologies like Zeo track our sleep patterns.  FitBit, Nike+ and DirectLife track our activity.  Geo-location technologies and sensors, track our every move.  If you’re not aware of the emergent area of quantified self technologies, check MeetUp for meetings in your area.    Example:  We can share genomic data on 23andme and adopted children can use these new technologies to find their birth parents.

Another, irresistible example given the headlines today:  We can read about every one of Tiger Woods’ lovers, read and listen to the text and voicemails exchanged, and learn a little about Tiger’s proclivities in bed.

In an era where we share our Zeo sleep data, use FourSquare to let our social network know our every move and Facebook and Twitter to share what we’re doing, what we’re thinking, who we’re connected to along with our favorite photos — what is privacy?

What can we benefit most from protecting?  My hunch is, it’s vulnerability and reputation.  What new tools and technologies support us to do this effectively?

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Filed under privacy, reputation, technology, vulnerability, ZG Mapping, ZG Maps

ZG Maps and ZG Mapping

People often say we’re multi-tasking ourselves to death.  What is it we’re doing and why has this become a passionate conversation?

I call what we’re doing today continuous partial attention, or cpa, for short.  In 1997, I created this meme to differentiate between simple and complex multi-tasking.   The motivations and the effects of simple vs. complex multi-tasking appeared to be very different to me.  I wanted a new name to describe what I was seeing in order to be very clear that when my mom was multi-tasking, she was doing something very different from what I found myself doing.

The meme, continuous partial attention, not only resonated with my colleagues in high tech and others outside of that field, it also ultimately led me into years of research – on individual and mass consciousness patterns of attention, trends, and related health and technology topics.

By now, I’ve developed what I’m calling  ZG Maps* and a process for using it called ZG Mapping. ZG Maps spans from 1945 and projects out toward 2025.   Some of the presentations I give at conferences and to corporations pull information from ZG Maps.  For corporate presentations, I often map the company’s history to the ZG Maps, illustrating when and how the company was in and out of sync with what I’ve come to call, the dominant mass consciousness attention paradigm.

In The Innovator’s Dilemma, Clayton Christensen outlines how successful companies can miss out on important disruptive technologies by focusing solely on iterating on sustaining technologies.  I admire Christensen’s work.

ZG Mapping comes at these issues from another point of view.  My favorite Alan Kay quote is:  “Point of view is worth 80 IQ points.”  Thus, coming at innovation from a variety of points of view can add IQ points!

With regard to innovation, in addition to keeping Christensen’s points in mind, I think it’s crucial for companies to also consider:

  1. How their products, services, marketing, recruiting and management efforts can resonate with cultural shifts. Attention, expressed collectively, can define a community, a society, a business, a corporate culture or a set of products and services.  Mass consciousness attention patterns are at the heart of the ZG Maps.  A set of values, orientations, and trends emerge from understanding how past patterns flow into the present patterns, and then, into likely future patterns.
  2. How the youngest generation entering the work force can play a significant role in a company’s future success. In many companies, the newest and youngest hires become trapped at the bottom of a steep management chain, engaged in menial work, with little opportunity to effectively offer one of their greatest gifts:  their knowing and sensibility of the incoming dominant mass consciousness attention paradigm.

 

 

These and other topics will be covered in future posts.

*ZG Maps:  ZG for Zeitgeist and Maps or Mapping for orientation or orienting

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Filed under attention, continuous partial attention, dominant mass consciousness attention paradigm, innovation, trends, ZG Mapping, ZG Maps